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Flesh & Bone

"Sam" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Scooter" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Daisy" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Buddy" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Amber" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Sweetie" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Cosmo" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Cheppo" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Layla" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Annie Oakley" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Ruby" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Jojo" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Nappy" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Vanzetti" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Keno" from the series FLESH AND BONE

"Lobo" from the series FLESH AND BONE

The large scale photographs from the series “Flesh and Bone” all have a height of 30″ and a length varying from 30″ to 97″. Each print is transferred onto aluminum using dye sublimation process. The images show a world of light and shadow, an abstraction that represents a state of suspended tranquility combined with an intimate eeriness. Playing on the idea of the familiar not being quite what it seems, this series takes seemingly simplistic images and turns them into something much more complex. When these ethereal landscapes of hills, valleys and horizons are examined more closely, exposed is a different kind of landscape—an internal landscape made up of flesh and bone.

Each photograph is created using canine medical imagery. Bone, muscle, internal organs, and other foreign devices used to repair their bodies such as plastic string and metal screws and plates that are usually hidden below the skin are uncovered. Some photographs are a direct re-photographing of a section of one radiograph, while others include multiple digital layers.

The “Flesh and Bone” images appear as moody, ambiguous landscapes, tied together with muted tonalities and a shifting horizontal line that divides land and sky. Yet there is tension accompanying this silent pictorial space: A metal screw suspended in time for a fleeting moment, vertebrae that create a contour line defining a section of land mass and unidentifiable filaments moving in space map out a visual journey of an unreal world.

By reshaping x-rays into landscapes, “Flesh and Bone” uses internal landscapes as a mimetic reflection of the external world to show how everything, from dust to dogs, is connected. This series reminds us through both fear and acceptance that we are all made of the same particle matter with apparent strengths and hidden vulnerabilities.

To learn more about this traveling exhibition, please contact the artist.

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